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Repetitive regret, depression, and anxiety: findings from a nationally representative survey

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dc.contributor.author Summerville, Amy en_US
dc.contributor.author Roese, Neal J. en_US
dc.contributor.author Epstude, Kai en_US
dc.contributor.author Fessel, Florian en_US
dc.contributor.author Morrison, Mike en_US
dc.contributor.author Smallman, Rachel en_US
dc.contributor.author Galinsky, Adam D. en_US
dc.contributor.author Segerstrom, Suzanne en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2011-04-07T17:37:58Z en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2013-07-10T15:09:40Z
dc.date.available 2011-04-07T17:37:58Z en_US
dc.date.available 2013-07-10T15:09:40Z
dc.date.issued 2011-04-07 en_US
dc.identifier.uri
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/2374.MIA/4415 en_US
dc.description.abstract Past research has established a connection between regret (negative emotions connected to cognitions about how past actions might have achieved better outcomes) and both depression and anxiety. in the present research, the relations between regret, repetitive thought, depression, and anxiety were examined in a nationally representative telephone survey. although both regret and repetitive thought were associated with general distress, only regret was associated with anhedonic depression and anxious arousal. Further, the interaction between regret and repetitive thought (i.e., repetitive regret) was highly predictive of general distress but not of anhedonic depression nor anxious arousal. these relations were strikingly consistent across demographic variables such as sex, race/ethnicity, age, education, and income. en_US
dc.title Repetitive regret, depression, and anxiety: findings from a nationally representative survey en_US
dc.type Text en_US
dc.date.published 2009 en_US


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